01 Death Valley National Park Overview

Death Valley Overview | Death Valley National Park, California

Death Valley National Park, California: View Hiking and Trail Running Adventures in Death Valley, one of the hottest places on planet Earth! Death Valley National Park is massive and offers deep wilderness adventure opportunities, car camping and sightseeing from numerous spectacular viewpoints, and lodging in cabins, motels and a luxurious Inn. Hiking includes everything from the salt pan desert floor below sea level to the spectacular peaks of the Panamint Mountain Range topping 11,000ft in elevation. In Death Valley you can find weird salt formations and ancient Bristlecone Pine trees. Best time of year to visit lower regions: Late Fall through Early Spring. Best time of year to visit the Panamint Mountains above 6,000ft: Late Spring through early Fall. Follow thumbnail images to view the details you will need to plan your adventures here. Click image or title above for more…

Aguereberry Point | Death Valley, California

Aguereberry Point | Death Valley, CA

At 6,433ft elevation Aguereberry Point sits on the West side of Death Valley in the Panamint Mountain Range. It’s nearly opposite to the more popular 5,575ft Dante’s View on the East side of Death Valley in the Funeral Mountains above Badwater. Aguereberry Point offers spectacular views the total length up and down Death Valley! Route details: Approx. 12 Miles RT; 4,800 > 6,433ft; **Unpaved Road 2WD When Freshly Graded** Click image or title above for more…

Artist’s Drive Hikes | Death Valley National Park, California

Few visitors to Artist Drive realize that there are at least 4 short adventure hikes off the main loop. The first is a ridge hike at the first pull-out parking area about 2 miles up the loop. The second two are canyon hikes at the base of 2 dips (actually marked by a yellow highway “Dip” warning sign. The fourth series of canyon hikes are the canyons surrounding the hills of Artist’s Pallet. Route details: 4 Hikes Approx. 6 Miles Total **Elevation Gain 300ft | Ridge and Canyon Wash Trails** Click image or title above for more…

Dante’s View to Mt Perry | Death Valley National Park, California

Dantes View to Mt Perry | Death Valley National Park, California

The elevation of Dante’s View is 5,475ft and the elevation of Mt. Perry is 5,716ft, but that alone is not the entire story. The scenery from Dante’s View all the way to Mt. Perry is uniquely spectacular. From Dante’s View’s 5,475ft perspective one can look almost straight down into Badwater Basin, at -282ft below sea level, the lowest point in the Western Hemisphere. But that is not all. From Dante’s view one can look directly across the width of the vast expanse of Death Valley 20.6 miles away to the 11,049ft Telescope Peak and the entire expanse of the Panamint Mountain Range along with much of Death Valley’s 100-mile length. Route Details: Approx. 8 Miles RT; 5,575 > 5,738ft **Well Established Trail** Click image or title above for more…

Darwin Falls | Death Valley National Park, California

Darwin Falls oasis is fed by a spring so powerful that it cascades as a large waterfall 80 feet down a cliff face year-round, giving rise to a seemingly unique and isolated tropical community of birds, frogs, reeds, ferns and trees surrounding the large pond at the base of the falls. The stream and the unique life zone then meanders along another quarter mile creating a few smaller singing waterfalls before finally disappearing into the floor of the arid desert canyon below. 2-Mile RT; approx. 2500 > 2700ft **Good Trail, Sketchy Near Falls** Click image or title above for more…

Death Valley In a Day | Death Valley National Park, California

Death Valley in a day is a one day whirlwind tour of many of the most popular sites in Death Valley National Park, California. It’s a great place to start if you are planning a brief first-time visit and overview of Death Valley. Locations visited in order: Dante’s View at sunrise, Zabriskie Point, Ubehebe Crater, Titus Canyon, Mesquite Sand Dunes, Devil’s Cornfield, Salt Creek, Harmony Borax Works, Furnace Visitor Center, Furnace Creek Ranch, Death Valley Museum, Devil’s Golf Course, Badwater Basin, Artist’s Drive, Golden Canyon, The Inn and Oasis at Death Valley. Sunrise to sunset in Death Valley.

Devil’s Racetrack by Mountain Bike | Death Valley National Park, California

Devil’s Racetrack is a dry flat lake bed in Death Valley, technically referred to as a playa, so flat that huge rocks are blown long distances by high winds when ground is wet. During wet, high wind conditions large rocks are moved across the lake bed leaving long tracks that are solidified when the lake bed is later baked in the high desert heat. This adventure journey covered nearly 40 miles of unpaved desert roads by mountain bike. Click image or title above for more…

Eureka Dunes by Mountain Bike | Death Valley National Park, California

Eureka Dunes | Death Valley, California

Eureka Dunes in Death Valley California and the tallest dunes in the State, rising over 680 feet above the desert floor. High winds on the dunes can literally blow you off your feet as you ascend toward the summit. However, you are likely to experience a soft landing on the sand. This trip via mountain bike covers around 40 miles of unpaved desert roads. Click image or title above for more…

Eureka Mine | Harrisburg (Aguereberry Camp) | Cashier Mill | Death Valley, California

Eureka Mine | Death Valley, California

Eureka Mine and its supporting mining town, Harrisburg (Aguereberry Camp) and Cashier Mill were founded by Pete Aguereberry and Shorty Harris in 1905. Cashier Mill, built in 1909, utilized gas power to extract gold from the ore hauled from Eureka Mine, first pulverizing the ore, then using mercury and cyanide to extract the gold. Route Details: Turn left off of Emigrant Canyon Road onto Aguereberry Point Road. Eureka Mine along with Pete Aguereberry’s Cabin and the Cashier Mill are less than a mile up the road on the right. Click image or title above for more…

Fall Canyon | Death Valley National Park, California

Fall Canyon | Death Valley National Park, California

Fall Canyon in Death Valley National Park is the wilder, lesser known neighbor just a short walk to the North of the more popular Titus Canyon. Unlike Titus Canyon you cannot drive through Fall Canyon. However, the show stopper here are the towering cliff walls surrounding you in Fall Canyon. Many of the walls have brilliant stripes and designs composed of orange and black dolomite and limestone, referred to as Banded Bonanza King formations. Alternately there are narrows with high walls smoothed by the rushing water and rocks from past flash floods. In addition there are what I refer to as “The Hanging Gardens of Fall Canyon” as you pass between cliffs decorated with hanging plants seemingly growing out of the solid rock walls. Route Details: Approx. 6 Miles RT; 2,460ft Elevation Gain **Rocky Canyon Wash Trail** Click image or title above for more…