Wildrose Peak | Death Valley, California

Wildrose Peak | Death Valley, California

Wildrose Peak is an 8.4 mile round trip trail beginning at the Wildrose Charcoal Kilns in Death Valley National Park, California. Ascending the excellent trail from the Wildrose Charcoal Kilns at 6,800ft elevation to the summit of Wildrose Peak at 9,064ft elevation, your total elevation gain is 2,264ft. Views at points along the trail and definitely from the summit are spectacular including the expanse of Death Valley almost directly below from Badwater to Furnace Creek and further in both directions with the Funeral Mountains as a backdrop. It’s a Grand Canyon level view! 8.4 Miles RT, 6,800 > 9,064ft **Excellent Trail** Click image or title above for more…

Wildrose Charcoal Kilns | Death Valley, California

The Death Valley Wildrose Charcoal Kilns, located on Charcoal Kiln Road near Telescope Peak in the Panamint Mountain Range are perhaps the best preserved Charcoal Kilns on earth. Built in 1877 to create charcoal used to smelt lead and silver in the Modock Mines about 25 miles West in the Argus Range, the Wildrose Charcoal Kilns were only used for 2 years. Click image or title above for more…

Telescope Peak Summit from Charcoal Kilns | Death Valley, California

Telescope Peak Summit from Charcoal Kilns | Death Valley, California

Telescope Peak, on the highest ridge of the Panamint Mountain Range bordering the West side of Death Valley is as close as you can get to experiencing the entire valley in one adventure. The feeling is purely magical as you traverse a ridge on top of the world, looking straight from that 11,049ft elevation down to Badwater, lowest point in the Western hemisphere at -282ft. Route details: 19 mi Roads, Trails (mostly), Wilderness
6800ft > 11,043ft **Mostly Excellent Trails** Click image or title above for more…

Mesquite Dunes at Sunrise | Death Valley National Park, California

Mesquite Dunes at Sunrise | Death Valley National Park, California

The Mesquite Sand Dunes turn every shade of color from white to golden during the hours of sunrise and sunset. But to witness the best display, you’ll need to wander into or out of the midst of the Mesquite Dunes in the dark, either before sunrise or after sunset. And during the time of pitch darkness, you’re either going to risk meeting up with a sidewinder rattlesnake during the warmer months from mid Spring through mid Fall, or getting very cold during the colder months from mid Fall through mid Spring. Route Details: Approx. 1.5 Miles RT; 100 – 200ft Elevation Gain **Wander Among the Dunes** Click image or title above for more…

Mosaic Canyon | Death Valley National Park, California

Mosaic Canyon | Death Valley National Park, California

Though Mosaic Canyon is not a true slot canyon, there are some similarities. The action of water over tens of thousands of years has cut through and polished the solid rock walls into a surface resembling fine marble. Scenes of polished rock recall images of what you’d like to see in the ultimate elaborate marble bathroom or natural swimming pool. In places, there are large polished walls of composite rock forming countless wonderful unique mosaic patterns. Route details: Approx. 2-4 Miles RT; Approx. 900 > 2,000ft **Good Canyon Trail** Click image or title above for more…

Devil’s Racetrack by Mountain Bike | Death Valley National Park, California

Devil’s Racetrack is a dry flat lake bed in Death Valley, technically referred to as a playa, so flat that huge rocks are blown long distances by high winds when ground is wet. During wet, high wind conditions large rocks are moved across the lake bed leaving long tracks that are solidified when the lake bed is later baked in the high desert heat. This adventure journey covered nearly 40 miles of unpaved desert roads by mountain bike. Click image or title above for more…

Titus Canyon Grand Loop by Mountain Bike | Death Valley National Park, California

The Titus Canyon Grand Loop by Mountain Bike is a huge 65.6-mile loop beginning and ending in Death Valley, California at a rest area just North of the intersection of Highway 394 (Daylight Pass Road) and Scotty’s Castle Road. There is no 2-car assist here. No car parked on each end of Titus Canyon. No one-way trip down Titus Canyon. Instead, the entire loop both up and down is made by mountain bike. Route details: Approx. 66 Miles; 7,000ft Elevation Gain; **1/2 Asphalt Rd, 1/2 Unpaved Rd** Click image or title above for more…

Tea House and Table Rock | Furnace Creek Ranch | Death Valley National Park, California

Tea House and Table Rock | Furnace Creek Ranch | Death Valley National Park, California

Tea House and Table Rock in Death Valley is a hike that delivers a huge reward in a short time. You will experience expansive 360 degree views of Death Valley. First of all, there are spectacular views up and down the length of Death Valley from the North to the South. Across to the West one can see the entire length of the Panamint Mountain Range. There is even a small cemetery with early explorer grave sites on one of the hills along the route. Route details: Approx. 2-4 Miles Circuit; -190 > about 300ft **No Trails, Navigate Desert** Click image or title above for more…

Return of Lake Manly | Lake in Death Valley | Death Valley National Park, California

Over time, Death Valley floor gradually became one of the lowest, hottest and driest places on earth. Lake Manly slowly evaporated leaving the salt flats at the base of Death Valley. Occasionally, a memory of Lake Manly returns to the floor of Death Valley in times when enough moisture manages to make it over the surrounding mountains. During this wet enough Winter, I had to stop and explore, making it nearly to the middle of the valley, to the shore of the very temporary Lake Manly. Route details: 2-4-mile RT; **Salt Flat, Streams and a Temporary Lake.

Natural Bridge Canyon | Death Valley National Park, California

Natural Bridge Canyon | Death Valley National Park, California

Natural Bridge Canyon in Death Valley National Park, California, contains one of the most massive and spectacular natural bridges I have seen. The entire area was once a huge alluvial fan of composite rock washed down from the Black Mountains above. Over time the fan hardened, and subsequent floods cut through the fan creating a fairly narrow canyon with high sheer vertical wall borders towering up from 40 to 100ft or more on either side. About a mile up the canyon from the parking area at the canyon’s entrance there is a massive natural bridge formed when water tunneled through the composite rock. Route details: Approx. 4 Miles RT
500ft Elevation Gain **Canyon Wash Route** Click image or title above for more…

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